Ask For A Raise in salary

How To Ask For A Raise In Salary

Asking for a raise is a delicate thing, and preparation is key.

  • Practice what you’re going to say.
  • Prepare yourself for a negative response.
  • Use positive body language: lean forward, smile, and make eye contact.
  • Don’t take it personally if you are not given the raise now – ask when would be the best time to re-ask in the future

 

Do These Things Before You Ask For A Raise In Salary

 

Prepare a list of your accomplishments

Now that you’re familiar with how to determine when the optimal time for a raise is, here are some tips on how to ask for and get one:

Gather Evidence. Before you go into your meeting, compile a list of your accomplishments over the past year. This will serve as a reminder of all the ways in which you have added value to the company throughout that time span.

Consider also comparing your current responsibilities against what was listed as part of your job description when you were hired—chances are, it has expanded since then! When applicable, use metrics or numbers that can help quantify the impact or results of your actions (e.g., “I have increased my team’s productivity by 25% since I became their manager”).

If possible, include specific examples supporting each action (e.g., “In order to accomplish this goal, I created three new workflows—for X, Y, and Z tasks—that saved an average of 15 minutes per task and enabled everyone in our team to deliver projects faster than before”). Here is a handy checklist from the Harvard Business Review of examples of work accomplishments that may be applicable in different situations.

 

Keep the focus on your work

It’s important to have a firm grasp of the situation. You should be able to summarize what you do, how you’ve made an impact in the company, and how long it’s been since your last raise.

Ask for raise confidently, but not cockily. Ask for a raise when you really deserve it, or else you might end up hurting yourself.

Prepare for objections and make your case as to why you feel like you’ve earned a raise.

 

The Best Way To Ask For A Raise In Salary

 

Schedule a meeting to discuss your performance and contribution to the company.

To schedule your meeting, pick a good time—a time that’s not too busy for you or your boss. Then, get it on the calendar by reaching out to your boss via email and attaching a few potential dates and times. That way, they can simply reply with the best option available. Once the meeting is scheduled, make sure you are prepared:

  • Do your research before coming in.
  • Decide whether or not you would be willing to accept less than what you ask for.
  • Be prepared to negotiate if needed.

After scheduling the meeting and prepping, leave it alone until the day of. Focus on other work and don’t second-guess yourself or let yourself become nervous about it; this could affect your mood negatively in day-to-day conversations with co-workers and even over email exchanges.

If needed, speak to someone who is on the neutral ground about how you feel—a friend outside of work or a mentor who knows nothing of the situation at hand—and take their advice into account when developing ideas around how best to approach a salary negotiation discussion with your manager.

Dedicate yourself to your current job duties

  • Develop an understanding of what is expected of you, how you can grow, and how your responsibilities fit into the overall mission

In order to do your job well and show that you’re valuable to the company, you need to dedicate yourself to your current job duties and develop an understanding of what is expected of you, how you can grow, and how your responsibilities fit into the overall mission. You may even want to ask for a list of your key responsibilities so there’s no confusion going forward.

Also, think about where you can take on additional responsibility without biting off more than you can chew. If it’s not in your current role, look at areas where you think they could use help. This will give you a chance to work with people in different teams and expand your network within the organization.

Stand up for yourself and your value.

Once you’ve got your talking points ready, ask for the meeting. Do it in person. Don’t leave a note or email your manager asking for the meeting, because that gives them an out to say no. Instead, go into their office (when they’re not on the phone) and tell them that you’d like to have a brief, private conversation with them as soon as possible.

A phone call is also acceptable if you can’t get him/her in person right away—just make sure it’s at a time when they won’t be too busy to focus on talking to you.

In order to ensure that your boss doesn’t feel blindsided by this conversation (or by your request), make sure you have some documentation of the reasons why you deserve this raise—your accomplishments, and anything else noteworthy, should be itemized and presented in writing.

If numbers are available (such as increased revenues from sales or number of new customers), include these along with any other relevant information that makes your case for a raise stronger. You know what’s important about your job—now is the time to show off how great an employee you are.

 

Prepare to make a case for why you are deserving of the raise.

  • Prepare to make a case for why you are deserving of the raise. Highlight your experience and contributions. The first step to getting a raise is proving that you are worth more than what you’re making now. That’s why it’s important to prepare answers ahead of time about how your salary has been low because of your lack of experience, education, or other factors. You should also discuss how long you have worked for the company, or in total, and be prepared to point out any hard facts or statistics showing how your success has contributed to the company’s success.

 

  • Point out specific examples of when you went above and beyond. Don’t be shy about talking up your accomplishments either! This isn’t the time to worry about bragging—it’s part of making your case for why you deserve a raise. Talk about the value that they don’t get from others; maybe it was a heavy workload that only one person could have handled, an impossible project done well, or even doing something outside of what is normally expected from someone in your position.

 

  • Do some research on average salaries for people who hold similar positions in similar companies as you do. A good rule of thumb is that if someone else with less experience than yourself is earning more money than you, then it might be time for a raise!

 

See Also;

 

Make a list of what you love about working there.

If you’re asking for a raise because you’re unhappy in your current role (whether due to a lack of challenges, creative block, or general discontent), it’s important to start looking for a new job before you approach your employer. This way, if the answer is no, you can give notice and move on without any hard feelings that would make the rest of your tenure at the company uncomfortable. There’s nothing wrong with preparing an exit strategy, just in case!

Be ready with a number in mind—but be prepared to negotiate.

Once you’ve done the math and looked at what other people in similar roles are earning, it’s time to decide on a number.

Now that you have a figure in mind, make a strong case as to why you deserve it.

“I think your point is valid, but let’s talk about how we’re going to approach this raised situation. I value your contribution to the team and don’t want you to feel like I’m undercutting it for the sake of my own finances.”

Then, ask: “When do you anticipate being able to make an adjustment?” If their answer is vague, such as “We’ll see,” follow up with something along the lines of “How can I help move this process along?”

Don’t strive for perfection.

I once worked with a woman who, after being given a task to complete, would vanish into her office until the job was finished. She’d come out when she had a 30-page report completed, or an entirely new marketing strategy written up and presented.

After completing these tasks, she’d be praised for her diligence… but I always wondered why it took so long for her to do things that didn’t require perfection. When asked about it, she’d reply that she wanted everything to be absolutely perfect before showing it to anyone else.

I don’t know about you, but I prefer the philosophy of “done is better than perfect.” In fact, successful leaders like Sheryl Sandberg and Elizabeth Holmes encourage us not to strive for perfectionism in our careers (or in life).

It doesn’t mean they’re okay with laziness or mediocrity—it’s more about having the confidence to take action, knowing you can learn from mistakes and improve along the way. At least if you try something, there’s still time and opportunity to adjust accordingly if needed.

To ask for a raise takes preparation, but it’s not impossible.

Asking for a raise is a delicate thing, and preparation is key.

  • Practice what you’re going to say.
  • Prepare yourself for a negative response.
  • Use positive body language: lean forward, smile, and make eye contact.
  • Don’t take it personally if you are not given the raise now – ask when would be the best time to re-ask in the future

If you do all of these things, your chances of getting that raise are much higher than if you just walk in cold turkey and say “I deserve this!”

 

Be prepared to negotiate on other benefits.

If flexibility isn’t going to make enough of an impact on your lifestyle and happiness at work, consider asking about other benefits instead. For example, offering tuition reimbursement could mean you can afford graduate school or certifications that will help you progress in your career faster—and qualify you for higher pay down the road.

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